[lpi-discuss] [LPI-News] Linux Professional Institute changesRecertification Policy

Luiz Ramos lramos at procomp.com.br
Mon Dec 4 06:28:43 EST 2006


Bryan:

First of all, I have high respect about your opinions. I read a lot of
your postings to this list before, and I know you have strong positions
about Linux and FOSS. I am replying privately, as I don't know if this
discussion can annoy some readers of the list.

>Bryan J. Smith [mailto:b.j.smith at ieee.org] wrote:
>Luiz Carlos Ramos <lramos at procomp.com.br> wrote:
>> The bottom line is that in my opinion, unfortunately, LPI is getting 
>> closer to the proprietary solutions to the certification and
education 
>> industry.
>
>Huh?  The exam development is _open_ to _all_ that wish to donate their
time and efforts.  The exam development is _not_ driven by vendors.  And
there is >still *0* money acquired from training or materials by LPI.
>
>_Please_ show me another organization that does this.  CompTIA is about
the only one in the IT industry, and they are _very_far_ from LPI in
both depth
>and openness.  Sorry, but I have to label this "rhetoric" with
absolutely no foundation.
>
>Please educate me on what you see as "proprietary" or otherwise
"closer" to other organizations in the industry.

Maybe I've been misunderstood. In my point of view, that is, the facts
plus my interpretation, there is a process which is driving LPI from a
"pure" community project to a "pure" proprietary project (I know "pure"
here is a fiction, a weberian ideal type). By "proprietary" I don't mean
any vendor in special, but a way of conducting the project. By "getting
closer to X" I mean that something is going towards B, and eventually
will reach B in a future (one can read that something is very near "X",
but that's not what I'd like to express).

My interpretation was based on the fact that the decision to change the
recertification policy didn't involve some key stakeholders. One of them
is ourselves, and this is a sign of not giving the appropriate value to
the community's point of view. In a process of change from A to B, one
can see signs of both A and B, in different proportions. That was a sign
of B, in my interpretation. One can argue that there are signs of A,
just like the exam development process, as you mention. The
interpretation is what makes the difference. Also, these processes may
take erratic paths, including being reversed.

Maybe I am confused about community, democracy and governance, but this
point is OT.

There was a second sign, which I prefer to not post to a list, and which
you in North America (I presume) has not seen, probably, which was a
change in the LPI affiliate in the Latin America, and specifically in
Brazil. I don't know the details, but the hands of who was conducting
the process were changed from a bunch of guys from a newborn training
center focused solely on Linux/FOSS to a organization with a fine name,
but which I don't know exactly who they are. I could see the first steps
of LPI here in Brazil (they published at the web a "log" of the
adventures in offering the first exams here in Brazil; I think it is in
Portuguese) and I could see what they did. I took the second LPI exams
stewarded by them, on a Saturday. It was in paper, and the prices were
put much lower than other countries, because they argued that the price
could be an obstacle for certifying the people in a country that is not
so rich as US or Europe. I saw the people who were taken the exams: they
were mostly newly graduates, or even before graduation, and there was a
fight for conquering their minds to FOSS. The first LPI staff has done a
nice work here, and the Brazilian numbers at LPI got very good for a
country like this (figures from Argentina or Chile, for instance, were
very poor if compared to Brazilian's numbers at that time). I could say
they were heroes. Now I don't know exactly who are the people
responsible for LPI here, but the the guys' CVs are like those of higher
level executives from PR or marketing. I couldn't see this as a sign
being more communitary. As of above, this is my interpretation, and
additionally, I don't know the details. Maybe the first LPI got
exhausted in offering exams at all the bigger cities of Brazil (it is a
large country), and gave up. That is, there is a risk that I am
completely wrong. That is the reason I prefer to not publicize this
opinion.

I think you are arguing LPI is a communitary project and will continue
to be. I understand your interpretation, and I hope you are right,
although I don't believe it anymore, unfortunately.

>> A proof is the scarse postings to this list, if compared to two or 
>> three years before.
>
>Huh?  This list has its periods of activity as well as inactivity, and
that has continued through this year as well.  I haven't seen any
change, just
>times of lower as well as increased volume.
>
>In fact, many of the bouts of former activity is when I made the fatal
errors of posting my thoughts on what consists of enterprise Linux.
Then the
>hordes of people would post how I was off-my-rocker and "nobody uses
that."  ;->
>
>Oh well, I've been doing so much embedded Linux as of late, I'm sure
I've slipped in my enterprise Linux knowledge over the last 15 months or
so.

I may agree with you. I haven't tracked all the last threads, but I saw
your name in a lot of them. Maybe these peaks on the list were related
to some hot threads which were full of postings from you and from some
others who frequently expressed opinions in the list. Nobody better than
you to remember these discussions. Anyway, there was no discussions
about recertification recently.

Again, you deserve my respect, even I may not agree with you in all
issues.


Luiz




-----Original Message-----
From: Bryan J. Smith [mailto:b.j.smith at ieee.org] 
Sent: sexta-feira, 1 de dezembro de 2006 20:20
To: General discussion relating to LPI.
Subject: Re: [lpi-discuss] [LPI-News] Linux Professional Institute
changesRecertification Policy

I debated whether to respond or not one last time.
Oh well, I lied ...

Luiz Carlos Ramos <lramos at procomp.com.br> wrote:
> The bottom line is that in my opinion, unfortunately, LPI is getting 
> closer to the proprietary solutions to the certification and education

> industry.

Huh?  The exam development is _open_ to _all_ that wish to donate their
time and efforts.  The exam development is _not_ driven by vendors.  And
there is still *0* money acquired from training or materials by LPI.

_Please_ show me another organization that does this.  CompTIA is about
the only one in the IT industry, and they are _very_far_ from LPI in
both depth and openness.  Sorry, but I have to label this "rhetoric"
with absolutely no foundation.

Please educate me on what you see as "proprietary" or otherwise "closer"
to other organizations in the industry.

> A proof is the scarse postings to this list, if compared to two or 
> three years before.

Huh?  This list has its periods of activity as well as inactivity, and
that has continued through this year as well.  I haven't seen any
change, just times of lower as well as increased volume.

In fact, many of the bouts of former activity is when I made the fatal
errors of posting my thoughts on what consists of enterprise Linux.
Then the hordes of people would post how I was off-my-rocker and "nobody
uses that."  ;->

Oh well, I've been doing so much embedded Linux as of late, I'm sure
I've slipped in my enterprise Linux knowledge over the last 15 months or
so.


-- 
Bryan J. Smith   Professional, Technical Annoyance
b.j.smith at ieee.org    http://thebs413.blogspot.com
--------------------------------------------------
     Fission Power:  An Inconvenient Solution
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